THE STORY OF (M)Y(OUR) LIFE – 03

If you ask them, people who love taking photographs of people will often tell you that they love capturing emotion. It’s such a griping pleasure that it might even be considered cliché.

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Aren’t all truest things the same?

This is the meat of it: the sink your teeth in to the success of it and the pursuit our cameras chase. To capture, and therefore somehow preserve, that look, that emotion, that moment.

In our story analogy this is the body. First context, then introductions, then the middle. The movement. The drama. Real life.

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Real life isn’t neat and tidy. It isn’t packaged into a perfect gift box that doesn’t involve children’s tears and dinner not being cooked and standing on all the lego. Real life is a week of a clingy whiney teething baby, followed by another. Real life is peanut butter sandwiches and playing with dolls in tutus. It’s the road that links the dream to our current circumstance. And living real life means we pull back the curtain on our imperfection and invite others in. Invite them in to see the truth without hiding: truth that sets us free.

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The how: don’t pack your camera away and do be intentional.  If you’re looking to capture emotions that might not be displayed for long moments, select a fast shutter speed. Do pack away your fear of revealing your ‘real’ self and remember that everyone has dust somewhere in their house. The body of your story doesn’t necessarily portray difficulty or struggle, but you can bring movement to your images by showing a range of emotion. And while not everyone always wants to capture the high emotion or rough moments, remember that without them your story will always be incomplete.

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Nicole Haynes