THE STORY OF (M)Y(OUR) LIFE – 02

In the beginning. An introduction.

We introduce people, things, places and ideas all the time: linking the unknown to the known, the strange to the familiar. It’s a job your photographs can do so well, if you let them. In a story it is the background information that enables the rest of what you have to say to be understood. It’s an easy formula: set the stage (context), introduce the people.

 

THE STORY OF (M)Y(OUR) LIFE – 02_1

Meet my friend…

This one time…

I have a friend…

I don’t know if you know this…

My mom always says…

I have a daughter who…

 

THE STORY OF (M)Y(OUR) LIFE – 02_2

Introductions pave the way for so much in this life. They connect, and they’re solely responsible for a whole host of ‘I wouldn’t be here today if not for…’. They fuse an old you to an added version of you, and if not for them your story would be different: because of different introductions.

THE STORY OF (M)Y(OUR) LIFE – 02_3

And so, a tip: introduce up close, and introduce zoomed out. Show the people in their place. If you’re shooting an event – maybe a birthday party, or kids prize giving, or a work function – make sure that anyone playing a lead role is in a photograph. Write a list if it’s important and you might forget. And then shoot others too. Try to get as many participants into your story as you can. Be intentional. Put your characters on the stage.

PS – This post is part of a series about telling the story of your life. For ages I’ve been wanting to share a little bit about capturing this life we live. I think the why is pretty important – the need to leave a legacy, the blessing of teaching our children and those around us how to remember things, and the gratitude that comes along with it when we choose the way we want to see the world.

But to do it effectively, the how becomes pretty important too. I want to give you a few easy tools to help you create beautiful images. It is none of it rocket science, but I thought I’d start a little series that looks at what I’ve found to be a few key elements to keep in the back of your mind when you’re trying to use your photographs to tell your story. You can read part one here.

Nicole Haynes